In his discussions of time in his Bref Instructions, George Silver outlines Four Times: The time of the hand, the time of the foot, the time of the hand and foot, and the time of the foot and hand

The time of the hand is the amount of time it takes to strike with the hand, ether from a ward or in place. 

The time of the foot is the amount of time it takes for a fighter to step forward to strike or to move towards their left side. 

The time of the hand and foot is when you move in order to strike rather than simply pressing forward.  It also refers to when you slide or move backwards and the hand and foot are equally agile.  

The time of the foot and hand refers to when you fight in guardant and use a slow motion for both the foot and hand.  

Something I always think about with respect to these times is that it seems in the time of the hand and foot the hand is positioned and/or moves before the foot.  When you strike your hand is moving before your foot so as to better maximize the time of you attack and so as not to telegraph your attack to your opponent.  When you retreat your hand still remains in front of your feet in order to better keep your sword between you and your opponent.  In the time of the foot and hand the position is reversed.  In the True Guardant fight the hand is above the head and thus above the feet and behind the front foot.  In the Bastard Guardant fight it is at shoulder height but still behind the front foot. 

Stephen Hand also discusses the following times in his book English Swordsmanship: The True Fight of George Silver, Vol. 1

The Time of the Hand is the amount it takes to move the hand and it is the fastest of the four times he discusses.  The Time of the Hand and Body is the time it takes to move the hand and then the body and thus it is the second fastest time.  Similarly the Times of the Hand, Body, and Foot and of the Hand, Body, and Feet are the times that it takes to move all of those limbs in turn and they are the third fastest and slowest times respectively.  Just as with Di Grassi’s circles of the arm, as you involve more of the body it takes longer to make the movement.

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